Help to support a New Resource!

Both  http://ahany.org/index.htm and and http://www.naanyc.org/index.php
See below:
http://ahany.org/sg_brooklyn.htm

http://www.naanyc.org/sgroup.html

They are currently not hosting any parent support groups for Nyc Brooklyn Parents. There is a need for Brooklyn Parents to have an Autism support Group!

Please support this cause so that we can offer support to our Brooklyn Nyc Residents!

 http://www.gofundme.com/nycdoeparent

Children’s First Networks and accountability

The NYC DOE has 60 Networks that are chosen by Nyc Public School Principals. There appears to be little accountability for these Networks. They are mainly responsible for Staff Development, so if teachers are not effective could some of that be due to the lack of proper support from these Networks? Poor Staff development or lack of?

Lets see what the DOE NYC has to say about it on the page below these is an office called OSS Office of School Support, that is to oversee these networks:

http://schools.nyc.gov/AboutUs/schools/support/OSS.htm

“Office of School Support

The Office of School Support (OSS) oversees the cluster and network structure, which provides instructional and operational support to more than 1,500 New York City public schools with the exception of charter schoolsDistrict 75, and District 79. OSS works with central, cluster and network teams to support school leaders and implement citywide initiatives across all functional areas, including:

  • Performance and academic policy
  • Special education reforms
  • Instructional support
  • Support for struggling schools
  • School budgets and grants
  • Human resources and payroll
  • Facilities, operations and IT
  • Student data systems
  • Enrollment

As you could see this OSS is not identified clearly. ”

The NYC DOE also Identifies the Principal as being an authority on accountability: 

“Networks

As part of a broad effort to empower principals, New York City’s school support structure has evolved into one that is dynamic and responsive to individual school and community needs. As of spring 2010, all schools receive their instructional and operational support from a team called a network. Network teams are made up primarily of experienced educators and professionals who bring expertise in specific areas such as instructional support, special education, school budgets, attendance, and student safety. Network teams support schools both in the field and from their offices around the city.

Principals can partner with one of nearly 60 networks that best meet the needs of their students and school communities. Some networks focus on instructional models that support particular groups of students, such as high school students who are over-aged and under-credited. Others are organized around a particular area of expertise or philosophy, such as project-based learning or leadership development. Networks offer school communities an array of high-quality school support options and let them determine which will best serve their students, staff, and entire community.

Networks are organized into five clusters of about 11 networks each. Cluster teams oversee and support networks and work closely with the Department of Education’s central leadership. Some networks are managed by a small group of Partnership Support Organizations, including New Visions, FHI 360, Fordham University, CUNY, and the CEI-PEA. All clusters and networks are overseen by the Office of School Support. Networks are evaluated annually.

Schools and principals are also supported by their superintendents.

Read more about the structure for supporting schools or find which network supports a school.

Types of Support

Each network team provides broad support to school communities. They offer training and coaching for principals and teachers, share instructional resources to meet each school’s needs, and help schools across the network collaborate with each other. Each network team includes several Achievement Coaches, who go directly to schools to help teachers and instructional leaders deliver rigorous instruction in their classrooms. On the operational side, network team members assist schools with budgets and grants, facilities, human resources, and much more.

Network Teams

Each network team is comprised of about 15 experienced educators and professionals and led by a network leader. Teams are flexibly organized and provide support for schools in the areas of instruction, operations, and student and family services. Each network team provides support to a group of approximately 25-35 schools.

Network Offices

Network teams maintain offices in all five boroughs, working out of 12 locations throughout the City. These offices serve as home base for network teams when they are not supporting schools in the field.”

 It really is not possible for one Principal to hold a whole Network accountable, why not give this power over to the teachers as well? 

 The Networks do not seem to be effective and are often times removed from the community school, since some networks are in other boroughs. These do not appear to be clear guidelines to how often these Networks are required to be in the school either. 

   Most parents and teachers do not even know who or What the CFN is!

NYC Council Pushes For More Diversity at Top Schools. Elementary Level is ignored. Hearing on Diversity in New York City Schools and Proposed Int. No. 511-A, Res. 453 & Res. 442

While the NYC Council focus is on the High school admissions process, they really should start expressing major concerns and discrepancies that begin in Kindergarden and throughout the elementary level. Starting perhaps at the G&T and specialized programs level.

“Specialized programs” and OSE or Office of Student Enrollment, have been creating “specialized programs” at the city wide level and at the school level for quite sometime as a way to weed out the best students.

Does anyone remember the magnet and eagle programs? Where did they go? Specialized programs are created so that the NYC DOE can appeal to upper middle class New York families. They also serve as a way to cloak elitism, racism and prejudices that have been an on going issue in the NYC DOE forever.

Last specialized programs are  very weak in their legal structure see part 200 and part 100.2

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/part100/pages/1002.html

Just imagine for a moment what it must be like to navigate through the NYC DOE process for specialized programs if you did not speak English?

What the city council needs to focus on is the relationship between OSE ( office of student enrollement ) and specialized programs including G&T.

The discrimination is not limited, nor does it begin at high school, It begins in elementary school without a doubt starting with the G&T process which is a nightmare in itself.

This of course could be easily solved by administering a test yearly to all students. If the NYC DOE really wants to provide FAPE without discrimination, this would be the only solution as it provides FAPE and a fair chance to all NYC Public School students and families.

School to Prison Pipeline

We need to stop the School to Prison Pipeline now! It would be great to see more protesting on diversity and the current school to prison pipeline.

There is a serious lack of awareness on this issue, it is a systemic problem. In order for real progress to happen we need to start teaching children that All lives Matter. We need to teach them that being different does not mean that they should be secluded or restrained. Parents need to know that they have rights reguardless of their child’s race, religion or disability.

I found the following websites helpful in learning more about this important issue:

http://www.nyclu.org/files/publications/nyclu_STPP_1021_FINAL.pdf

https://www2.ed.gov/policy/seclusion/summary-by-state.pdf

Pages 142-150 are important for NYS and NYC