How the new Framework vision aligns with NYC CEP (comprehensive educational plan), and how it excludes Parent Engagement and Students with Special Needs.

If you look at your NYC schools’ Portal page  by typing the name and then portal page

http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/22/K139/default.htm

139

Looking at the statistics and Budget tab to the left and click, Then scroll to the following on that page ( lots of other helpful info on this page so feel free to explore and learn more about your students school). For this blog we are going to look at the CEP (Comprehensive Educational Plan) click there.

139CEP.png

http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/22/K139/AboutUs/Statistics/default.htm

and the  plan will come up like this : http://schools.nyc.gov/documents/oaosi/cep/2015-16/cep_K139.pdf

Lets look at page 2. cep_K139

CEPnote.png

Now remember the Framework from my last blog https://nycdoeandme.wordpress.com/2015/11/22/nyc-doe-and-the-new-framework-is-not-working/ cfgraphicslider1 Now you can see exactly  why they created this Framework!

Once again Sadly Students with the highest needs and those that are unidentified are left out of the Framework for student achievement. 

 

The plan is to ignore the students in need, clearly there is not a working model that identifies students in need. Only the teachers and parents that are the most sensitive  and aware will refer students to get tested and recommended for AIS or special education services. I believe that all students should be evaluated for both in a way that is aligned with Scientifically based practices.

 

 

NYC DOE And the new Framework is not working.

I think that the new NYC Public schools support structure clearly lacks any real support. In that there is little to no effective use of leadership and even once decent teachers now turned admins have lost their skills to lead by example.

Why is the NYC DOE’s Chancellor and her leadership team lacking any real creative thinkers?

If we really want to reduce class size and help teachers teach, why not explore turning the offices of the BFSC and Districts and the tons of other DOE office locations into teaching centers for students, teachers, parents and staff who need/want more support. Schools are on their own and have no real access to “effective leadership” as they call it.

 

This would in response look like a support staff/center that actually teaches/supports the school. “Effective leadership should encompass a component of leading by example instead of sitting In front of a damn computer all day, and never doing one drop of real teaching.

How is it that a pilot  program has not been proposed? One in which all administrative teaching staff including the Superintendent consistently spend one day per week or even month teaching in classrooms with real students? How can a leader/mentor our schools without staying in practice? Generations change, teaching methods that were once effective loose their effectiveness

If you are no familiar with the new Vision/ framework see these resources below:

 

Watch the video below

video from city hall http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx

The press release:

http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/mediarelations/NewsandSpeeches/2015-2016/Chancellor+Announces+Opening+of+New+Borough+Field+Support+Centers.htm

If you see the vision frame work here: http://schools.nyc.gov/AboutUs/schools/framework/default.htm

cfgraphicslider1

As you can now tell  They Completely leave out the very Idea of “leading by example  In other words do not tell me but show me is by far the only way to lead and is the very foundation of what education means. I have created my own version, which is  based on what I think should be 6 themes surrounding education and student achievement  in NYC.

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Funding is the top priority over trust, and yes it is more important then trust. How can there be trust when funding is always vanishing and mishandled?

Effective leadership would not be ridden with lies and illusive vague “support”, most of the administrations currently in our schools have not a clue who the BFSC liaison are nor what they do. There is nothing supportive about them so far as parents and staff at school can see.

By providing a nurturing environment a supportive environment is guaranteed is guaranteed.

Rigorous instruction is meaningless if it is not developmentally appropriate.

Collaborative teaching is in no way happening. From what my sources say is teachers are forced to stay extra on Mondays and are given curriculum to review from some where and someone they have never met, and is not human but a data base called Engaged.

Considerate community ties vs strong family- community ties would provide meaningful support and consideration to NYC public School students and their families. Many of the CEC and the CCEC are not meeting quorum and are not representing their community because the parents have no voice or council.

 

Now you try.

 

Also find out who your BFSC is here http://www.uftsolidarity.org/bfsc/ be sure to scroll on the Arrows near where it says ATS

See how willing they are to provide support!

 

Children’s First Networks and accountability

The NYC DOE has 60 Networks that are chosen by Nyc Public School Principals. There appears to be little accountability for these Networks. They are mainly responsible for Staff Development, so if teachers are not effective could some of that be due to the lack of proper support from these Networks? Poor Staff development or lack of?

Lets see what the DOE NYC has to say about it on the page below these is an office called OSS Office of School Support, that is to oversee these networks:

http://schools.nyc.gov/AboutUs/schools/support/OSS.htm

“Office of School Support

The Office of School Support (OSS) oversees the cluster and network structure, which provides instructional and operational support to more than 1,500 New York City public schools with the exception of charter schoolsDistrict 75, and District 79. OSS works with central, cluster and network teams to support school leaders and implement citywide initiatives across all functional areas, including:

  • Performance and academic policy
  • Special education reforms
  • Instructional support
  • Support for struggling schools
  • School budgets and grants
  • Human resources and payroll
  • Facilities, operations and IT
  • Student data systems
  • Enrollment

As you could see this OSS is not identified clearly. ”

The NYC DOE also Identifies the Principal as being an authority on accountability: 

“Networks

As part of a broad effort to empower principals, New York City’s school support structure has evolved into one that is dynamic and responsive to individual school and community needs. As of spring 2010, all schools receive their instructional and operational support from a team called a network. Network teams are made up primarily of experienced educators and professionals who bring expertise in specific areas such as instructional support, special education, school budgets, attendance, and student safety. Network teams support schools both in the field and from their offices around the city.

Principals can partner with one of nearly 60 networks that best meet the needs of their students and school communities. Some networks focus on instructional models that support particular groups of students, such as high school students who are over-aged and under-credited. Others are organized around a particular area of expertise or philosophy, such as project-based learning or leadership development. Networks offer school communities an array of high-quality school support options and let them determine which will best serve their students, staff, and entire community.

Networks are organized into five clusters of about 11 networks each. Cluster teams oversee and support networks and work closely with the Department of Education’s central leadership. Some networks are managed by a small group of Partnership Support Organizations, including New Visions, FHI 360, Fordham University, CUNY, and the CEI-PEA. All clusters and networks are overseen by the Office of School Support. Networks are evaluated annually.

Schools and principals are also supported by their superintendents.

Read more about the structure for supporting schools or find which network supports a school.

Types of Support

Each network team provides broad support to school communities. They offer training and coaching for principals and teachers, share instructional resources to meet each school’s needs, and help schools across the network collaborate with each other. Each network team includes several Achievement Coaches, who go directly to schools to help teachers and instructional leaders deliver rigorous instruction in their classrooms. On the operational side, network team members assist schools with budgets and grants, facilities, human resources, and much more.

Network Teams

Each network team is comprised of about 15 experienced educators and professionals and led by a network leader. Teams are flexibly organized and provide support for schools in the areas of instruction, operations, and student and family services. Each network team provides support to a group of approximately 25-35 schools.

Network Offices

Network teams maintain offices in all five boroughs, working out of 12 locations throughout the City. These offices serve as home base for network teams when they are not supporting schools in the field.”

 It really is not possible for one Principal to hold a whole Network accountable, why not give this power over to the teachers as well? 

 The Networks do not seem to be effective and are often times removed from the community school, since some networks are in other boroughs. These do not appear to be clear guidelines to how often these Networks are required to be in the school either. 

   Most parents and teachers do not even know who or What the CFN is!