How the new Framework vision aligns with NYC CEP (comprehensive educational plan), and how it excludes Parent Engagement and Students with Special Needs.

If you look at your NYC schools’ Portal page  by typing the name and then portal page

http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/22/K139/default.htm

139

Looking at the statistics and Budget tab to the left and click, Then scroll to the following on that page ( lots of other helpful info on this page so feel free to explore and learn more about your students school). For this blog we are going to look at the CEP (Comprehensive Educational Plan) click there.

139CEP.png

http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/22/K139/AboutUs/Statistics/default.htm

and the  plan will come up like this : http://schools.nyc.gov/documents/oaosi/cep/2015-16/cep_K139.pdf

Lets look at page 2. cep_K139

CEPnote.png

Now remember the Framework from my last blog https://nycdoeandme.wordpress.com/2015/11/22/nyc-doe-and-the-new-framework-is-not-working/ cfgraphicslider1 Now you can see exactly  why they created this Framework!

Once again Sadly Students with the highest needs and those that are unidentified are left out of the Framework for student achievement. 

 

The plan is to ignore the students in need, clearly there is not a working model that identifies students in need. Only the teachers and parents that are the most sensitive  and aware will refer students to get tested and recommended for AIS or special education services. I believe that all students should be evaluated for both in a way that is aligned with Scientifically based practices.

 

 

Inclusion and General Education

Comrades! Parents!

Why do we allow the public School system to push our children with disabilities into state approved schools? Schools that provide no oppritunities to be in the least restrictive environment?

When will we learn that Self direction and Self determination is our right in the academic world?

My son with Autism has gained an immense amount of support thanks to the HCBS wavier, without being in a residential facility .

This summer alone he has achieved many goals and valued outcomes amongst Typical Peers!

Baseball, Swimming, and even participated in a Rock Band.

Inclusion is possible.

Children’s First Networks and accountability

The NYC DOE has 60 Networks that are chosen by Nyc Public School Principals. There appears to be little accountability for these Networks. They are mainly responsible for Staff Development, so if teachers are not effective could some of that be due to the lack of proper support from these Networks? Poor Staff development or lack of?

Lets see what the DOE NYC has to say about it on the page below these is an office called OSS Office of School Support, that is to oversee these networks:

http://schools.nyc.gov/AboutUs/schools/support/OSS.htm

“Office of School Support

The Office of School Support (OSS) oversees the cluster and network structure, which provides instructional and operational support to more than 1,500 New York City public schools with the exception of charter schoolsDistrict 75, and District 79. OSS works with central, cluster and network teams to support school leaders and implement citywide initiatives across all functional areas, including:

  • Performance and academic policy
  • Special education reforms
  • Instructional support
  • Support for struggling schools
  • School budgets and grants
  • Human resources and payroll
  • Facilities, operations and IT
  • Student data systems
  • Enrollment

As you could see this OSS is not identified clearly. ”

The NYC DOE also Identifies the Principal as being an authority on accountability: 

“Networks

As part of a broad effort to empower principals, New York City’s school support structure has evolved into one that is dynamic and responsive to individual school and community needs. As of spring 2010, all schools receive their instructional and operational support from a team called a network. Network teams are made up primarily of experienced educators and professionals who bring expertise in specific areas such as instructional support, special education, school budgets, attendance, and student safety. Network teams support schools both in the field and from their offices around the city.

Principals can partner with one of nearly 60 networks that best meet the needs of their students and school communities. Some networks focus on instructional models that support particular groups of students, such as high school students who are over-aged and under-credited. Others are organized around a particular area of expertise or philosophy, such as project-based learning or leadership development. Networks offer school communities an array of high-quality school support options and let them determine which will best serve their students, staff, and entire community.

Networks are organized into five clusters of about 11 networks each. Cluster teams oversee and support networks and work closely with the Department of Education’s central leadership. Some networks are managed by a small group of Partnership Support Organizations, including New Visions, FHI 360, Fordham University, CUNY, and the CEI-PEA. All clusters and networks are overseen by the Office of School Support. Networks are evaluated annually.

Schools and principals are also supported by their superintendents.

Read more about the structure for supporting schools or find which network supports a school.

Types of Support

Each network team provides broad support to school communities. They offer training and coaching for principals and teachers, share instructional resources to meet each school’s needs, and help schools across the network collaborate with each other. Each network team includes several Achievement Coaches, who go directly to schools to help teachers and instructional leaders deliver rigorous instruction in their classrooms. On the operational side, network team members assist schools with budgets and grants, facilities, human resources, and much more.

Network Teams

Each network team is comprised of about 15 experienced educators and professionals and led by a network leader. Teams are flexibly organized and provide support for schools in the areas of instruction, operations, and student and family services. Each network team provides support to a group of approximately 25-35 schools.

Network Offices

Network teams maintain offices in all five boroughs, working out of 12 locations throughout the City. These offices serve as home base for network teams when they are not supporting schools in the field.”

 It really is not possible for one Principal to hold a whole Network accountable, why not give this power over to the teachers as well? 

 The Networks do not seem to be effective and are often times removed from the community school, since some networks are in other boroughs. These do not appear to be clear guidelines to how often these Networks are required to be in the school either. 

   Most parents and teachers do not even know who or What the CFN is!

NYC Council Pushes For More Diversity at Top Schools. Elementary Level is ignored. Hearing on Diversity in New York City Schools and Proposed Int. No. 511-A, Res. 453 & Res. 442

While the NYC Council focus is on the High school admissions process, they really should start expressing major concerns and discrepancies that begin in Kindergarden and throughout the elementary level. Starting perhaps at the G&T and specialized programs level.

“Specialized programs” and OSE or Office of Student Enrollment, have been creating “specialized programs” at the city wide level and at the school level for quite sometime as a way to weed out the best students.

Does anyone remember the magnet and eagle programs? Where did they go? Specialized programs are created so that the NYC DOE can appeal to upper middle class New York families. They also serve as a way to cloak elitism, racism and prejudices that have been an on going issue in the NYC DOE forever.

Last specialized programs are  very weak in their legal structure see part 200 and part 100.2

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/part100/pages/1002.html

Just imagine for a moment what it must be like to navigate through the NYC DOE process for specialized programs if you did not speak English?

What the city council needs to focus on is the relationship between OSE ( office of student enrollement ) and specialized programs including G&T.

The discrimination is not limited, nor does it begin at high school, It begins in elementary school without a doubt starting with the G&T process which is a nightmare in itself.

This of course could be easily solved by administering a test yearly to all students. If the NYC DOE really wants to provide FAPE without discrimination, this would be the only solution as it provides FAPE and a fair chance to all NYC Public School students and families.

School to Prison Pipeline

We need to stop the School to Prison Pipeline now! It would be great to see more protesting on diversity and the current school to prison pipeline.

There is a serious lack of awareness on this issue, it is a systemic problem. In order for real progress to happen we need to start teaching children that All lives Matter. We need to teach them that being different does not mean that they should be secluded or restrained. Parents need to know that they have rights reguardless of their child’s race, religion or disability.

I found the following websites helpful in learning more about this important issue:

http://www.nyclu.org/files/publications/nyclu_STPP_1021_FINAL.pdf

https://www2.ed.gov/policy/seclusion/summary-by-state.pdf

Pages 142-150 are important for NYS and NYC

Websites Work in Progress

Legal Informmantion

http://www.wrightslaw.com

http://www.counsel.nysed.gov/appeals/instruction

http://www.copaa.org/?page=LegalAd

REGS complete-Aug2014.pdf

sampleform-912.doc

Autism Sites

http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc_tests

http://www.thenhf.com/hyperlexia-separating-autistic-like-symptoms-from-autism-children-who-read-early-or-speak-late-by-darold-a-treffert-m-d/#respond

http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10017&page=R2

http://www.ahany.org

Must Read Books

Health Reference Series ( Choose the one that correlates with the disability ).

I have this one: http://omnigraphics.com/shop/autism-and-pervasive-developmental-disorders-sourcebook-2nd-ed/#description

http://www.amazon.com/The-IEP-Meaningful-Measurable-Objectives/dp/047056234X

http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10017&page=R2

OPWDD

http://www.opwdd.ny.gov/opwdd_services_supports/service_providers/provider_performance/reports/listing

http://www.opwdd.ny.gov/index.php

Tools:

Laser jet printer black ink only

4 large binders

1. For school and IEP paper work

2. Assessments

3. School work

4.OPWDD

Clear sheets,hole puncher, folders,paper,

Marble notebook.  (for daily notes and phone calls, Progress and follow up, date each page)

these fill up fast

Were Avonte and Dyasha ever offered an Approved private school???

Why is it that children who are much higher functioning are sent to Private schools and those that truly need it were not?

If the DOE NYC really cared about children with special needs they would have offered approved private school placement to these students. These things do not happen in state approved private schools. The doors are locked and safety is a top priority!

The DOE NYC only offers private school to parents who fight for it, which is just unfair and wrong. D75 schools/seats need to be safer and better looked at. LRE should not mean death and mistreatment.

I highly doubt that the DOE NYC ever offered a state approved private school to Avonte’s or Dyasha’s parents. They never admit (with out an advocate) that they cannot teach a child or provide FAPE and they should. It would save everyone a lot of heart ache and money.

When is the last time you heard a child escaping or dying while in one of the schools on this list?

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/privateschools/853-statewide.htm

or the non approved schools like Cooke or GERSH?

The children below may still be alive today if they had been offered a state approved private school.

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Student-Choke-Death-Brooklyn-School-Department-Education-280682712.html

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/cause-of-death-for-autistic-nyc-boy-avonte-oquendo-undetermined/

http://online.wsj.com/articles/missing-brooklyn-student-found-1411049547

http://www.nycparentsunion.org/archives/1302